webmaster      Blacks In Government, BIG U.S. Department of Education Chapter © Washington, D.C.,  Region XI         

Message from the President.

I am very pleased to welcome you to the U.S. Department of Education Chapter of Blacks In Government, BIG-ED for short. Please take a few minutes to read our goals and objectives along with the 10 Reasons You Should Join ED-BIG. We are both a resource and an advocate for Blacks in government. We also welcomes and encourage returning and new members to be active participants as we strive to improve the workforce at ED for Black employees. We hope you will join us as we move to expand our scope of influence and advocacy on your behalf.


Wanda E. Gill, Ed.D.

President

ED Chapter, Blacks In Government

Room 4W248


1. To be an advocate of equal opportunity for Blacks in government.

2. To eliminate practices of racism and racial discrimination against Blacks in government.

3. To promote professionalism among Blacks in government.

4. To develop and promote programs which will enhance ethnic pride and educational opportunities for Blacks in government.

5. To establish a mechanism for the gathering and dissemination of information to Blacks in government.

6. To provide a nonpartisan platform on major issues of local, regional, and national significance that affect Blacks in government.


BIG GOALS & OBJECTIVES


There are many reasons to join Blacks in Government in general, and the Education Chapter, particularly. The first starts with knowing what you want to get out of BIG. The second answers what do you want to give to BIG? What you both give to BIG and get from BIG makes BIG what it is. No organization can fulfill your needs if you neither speak up nor step up. Being a part of BIG provides strength.


If you want to go quickly, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.

~ African proverb



 Click here for 10 Good Reasons to Join ED-BIG.




Why Join BIG?

April’s BIG Haiku

Asa Phillip Randolph

(1889 - 1979)

Once called the most dangerous black in America; founder and President of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, major planner of the 1963 March on Washington led by Dr. Martin Luther King.

“A community is democratic only when the humblest and weakest person can enjoy the highest civil, economic and social rights that the biggest and most powerful possess."

Jane M. Bolin

(1908 - 2007)

The first Black American, Woman judge and first Black Woman to receive a law degree from Yale. Served on the boards of the Child Welfare League of America, NAACP, and the Urban League.

"Those gains we have made were never graciously and generously granted. We have had to fight every inch of the way—in the face of sometimes insufferable humiliations."

Two Giants of April

you cannot just sit back

and wait for everyone else

To do what needs done                      (Jesse Sharpe)

MUST READ

Secretary of U.S. Department of Educatin, Arne Duncan’s email to concerning 2011-2012 Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC) at J.O. Wilson Elementary School here in Washington.