webmaster      Blacks In Government, BIG U.S. Department of Education Chapter © Washington, D.C.,  Region XI         

Message from the President.

I am very pleased to welcome you to the U.S. Department of Education Chapter of Blacks In Government, BIG-ED for short. Please take a few minutes to read our goals and objectives along with the 10 Reasons You Should Join ED-BIG. We are both a resource and an advocate for Blacks in government. We also welcomes and encourage returning and new members to be active participants as we strive to improve the workforce at ED for Black employees. We hope you will join us as we move to expand our scope of influence and advocacy on your behalf.


Wanda E. Gill, Ed.D.

President

ED Chapter, Blacks In Government

Room 4W248


1. To be an advocate of equal opportunity for Blacks in government.

2. To eliminate practices of racism and racial discrimination against Blacks in government.

3. To promote professionalism among Blacks in government.

4. To develop and promote programs which will enhance ethnic pride and educational opportunities for Blacks in government.

5. To establish a mechanism for the gathering and dissemination of information to Blacks in government.

6. To provide a nonpartisan platform on major issues of local, regional, and national significance that affect Blacks in government.


BIG GOALS & OBJECTIVES


There are many reasons to join Blacks in Government in general, and the Education Chapter, particularly. The first starts with knowing what you want to get out of BIG. The second answers what do you want to give to BIG? What you both give to BIG and get from BIG makes BIG what it is. No organization can fulfill your needs if you neither speak up nor step up. Being a part of BIG provides strength.


If you want to go quickly, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.

~ African proverb



 Click here for 10 Good Reasons to Join ED-BIG.




Why Join BIG?

October’s BIG Haiku

Black History in October

when you are at work

nuances holding you back

have no room to play

The Million Man March was a gathering en masse of African-Americans in Washington, D.C. on October 16, 1995. Called by Louis Farrakhan, it was held on and around the National Mall in the city. The National African American Leadership Summit, a leading group of civil rights activists and the Nation of Islam working in conjunction with scores of civil rights organizations including many local chapters of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (but not the national NAACP) formed the Million Man March Organizing Committee. The founder of the National African American Leadership Summit, Dr. Benjamin Chavis, Jr. served as National Director of the Million Man March.

Edith Spurlock Sampson (October 13, 1898 – October 8, 1979) was an American lawyer and judge, and the first Black U.S. delegate appointed to the United Nations.

1n 1974, Sampson opened a law office on the South Side of Chicago, serving the local black community. From 1925 through 1942, she was associated with the Juvenile Court of Cook County, serving as a probation officer. Sampson became the first woman to earn a Master of Laws from Loyola University's Graduate Law School in 1927. She also passed the Illinois State Bar exam that year. In 1934, she was admitted to practice before the Supreme Court. In 1943, she became one of the first black members of the National Association of Women Lawyers. In 1947, she was appointed an Assistant State's Attorney in Cook County.

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