webmaster      Blacks In Government, BIG U.S. Department of Education Chapter © Washington, D.C.,  Region XI         

Message from the President.

I am very pleased to welcome you to the U.S. Department of Education Chapter of Blacks In Government, BIG-ED for short. Please take a few minutes to read our goals and objectives along with the 10 Reasons You Should Join ED-BIG. We are both a resource and an advocate for Blacks in government. We also welcomes and encourage returning and new members to be active participants as we strive to improve the workforce at ED for Black employees. We hope you will join us as we move to expand our scope of influence and advocacy on your behalf.


Wanda E. Gill, Ed.D.

President

ED Chapter, Blacks In Government

Room 4W248


1. To be an advocate of equal opportunity for Blacks in government.

2. To eliminate practices of racism and racial discrimination against Blacks in government.

3. To promote professionalism among Blacks in government.

4. To develop and promote programs which will enhance ethnic pride and educational opportunities for Blacks in government.

5. To establish a mechanism for the gathering and dissemination of information to Blacks in government.

6. To provide a nonpartisan platform on major issues of local, regional, and national significance that affect Blacks in government.


BIG GOALS & OBJECTIVES


There are many reasons to join Blacks in Government in general, and the Education Chapter, particularly. The first starts with knowing what you want to get out of BIG. The second answers what do you want to give to BIG? What you both give to BIG and get from BIG makes BIG what it is. No organization can fulfill your needs if you neither speak up nor step up. Being a part of BIG provides strength.


If you want to go quickly, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.

~ African proverb



 Click here for 10 Good Reasons to Join ED-BIG.




Why Join BIG?

August BIG Haiku

Black History in August

overcoming odds

and defeating challenges

are marks of success

Ralph J. Bunche, born on August 7, 1903 or '04 in Detroit,  excelled at academics to become a professor and federal officer specializing in international work. He joined the United Nations in 1947 and oversaw a heralded armistice in the Arab-Israeli conflict. He was awarded the 1950 Nobel Peace Prize and later oversaw peacekeeping efforts in the Congo, Cyprus and Bahrain. He died on December 9, 1971.

Ethel L. Payne (August 14, 1911 – May 28, 1991) was an African-American journalist. Known as the "First Lady of the Black Press", she was a columnist, lecturer, and freelance writer. She combined advocacy with journalism as she reported on the civil rights movement during the 1950s and 1960s. She became the first female African-American commentator employed by a national network when CBS hired her in 1972. In addition to her reporting of American domestic politics, she also covered international stories.